We said goodbye to the sisters at the nunnery and headed to The Gambian border.

En route, we stopped for a break on a river. I've forgotten where it was. Nice views, but there was a tremendous quantity of rubbish that had been dumped in piles and had not washed up onto the river.

Beach in Senegal en route to ferry at Foundiougne. Beach in Senegal en route to ferry at Foundiougne. Lots of rubbish on beach in Senegal en route to ferry at Foundiougne. Lots of rubbish on beach in Senegal en route to ferry at Foundiougne.

At Foundiougne, we caught the ferry for 400 CFA. We were lucky as there are only several trips each day and we boarded as soon as we arrived.

Motorcycle and I on board ferry at Foundiougne, Senegal. On board ferry at Foundiougne, Senegal.

The ferry only had one engine working. Who knows what would have happened if the engine stopped.

Only one engine working on board ferry at Foundiougne, Senegal.

Most goats I've seen have been roaming free (i.e., across roads), but this one was in the boot of a vehicle on the ferry.

Goat in boot on board ferry at Foundiougne, Senegal.

On the Foundiougne side, there was a white building shaped like a boat pointing into the water.

White building shaped like a boat at Foundiougne, Senegal.

We arrived at the Senegal-Gambia border at Karang at early afternoon, and both Jonny and I were hungry. I had rice and fish, which was delicious; however, very expensive.

Rice and fish in Karang, Senegal before the border to The Gambia. Rice and fish in Karang, Senegal before the border to The Gambia.

Once our bodies were refuelled, we rode 50 metres to the border with paperwork ready. I haggled a bit more Gambian Dalasi than was offered from a money changer. This was to tide me over until reaching Banjul, which is nearby. Departing Senegal was easy enough. Entering The Gambia was slightly more challenging. There is no cost to enter The Gambia; however, customs requested 5000 CFA, which we regretably paid. The police then requested another 5000 CFA to stamp our passavant. I refused and discussion was pursued. The payment is unofficial so they refused a receipt to show evidence of payment. I said I was happy to stay there overnight and for days until they returned my passavant without me paying. Eventually, after about 20-30 minutes of discussion their boss let us through without paying. I refused payments to police when leaving Mauritania (it took 30 seconds and there was no discussion), but today was well outside of my comfort zone. A slightly underwhelming start to The Gambia because of this, but we're in!

We stayed at a hippie compound that evening. The track there was 2.5 miles from the main road and there was some very soft sand. They back end of the bike slide left and right over the tricky soft sand and the width of the track catered for me snaking through it. The owner has a permaculture garden and guided me through how they grow and the medical uses of each plant. The shower was open air and with a bucket and cup.

Open air shower at campground, The Gambia.

I spotted a reasonably large spider in the shower. No idea what the spider is, but looks different to what I've seen before. I kept my distance (other than the photo).

Spider in open air shower at campground, The Gambia.

They provided chicken, chips, noodles, and onion sauce. Jonny didn't want his chicken, so I ate his! That's breakfast and two large meals today! Bush tea was drank, which tasted really nice. The owner, Mr B, was insistent that foreigners drank it to help with any digestive problems.

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