After a night of wild camping where we were supposed to be stealth, we woke up to multiple people tending their cattle who said hello. They were friendly and OK with our presence, but so much for being stealth!

The Gambia's vegetation is more luscious than previous countries on my route through the Sahara region of North West Africa. We encountered a large river with a strong and sturdy bridge.

A bridge on the Southbank of The Gambia.

Here's Jonny on the bridge!

@atjonnynomad riding over a bridge on the Southbank of The Gambia..

The Gambia has many Baobab trees. They have a distinctive thick trunk all the way to the top.

Boabab tree in The Gambia. Boabab tree in The Gambia.

We rode a short stint into Janjanbureh where a guide showed us around and explained the slave history of this location.

A building were slaves were stored.

Building used to store slaves at Janjanbureh, The Gambia.

The harbour were slaves departed en route to Goree Island, Dakar.

Harbour used to transport slaves from Janjanbureh, The Gambia. Harbour used to transport slaves from Janjanbureh, The Gambia.

A building where slaves were stored.

Building used to store slaves at Janjanbureh, The Gambia. Building used to store slaves at Janjanbureh, The Gambia.

The Freedom Tree where ...

The Freedom Tree Building at Janjanbureh, The Gambia. The Freedom Tree Building at Janjanbureh, The Gambia.

A canon within the officer's grounds.

Canon in officers' grounds at Janjanbureh, The Gambia..

The markets in The Gambia are really cool! Benches and floors are laden with scotch bonnets, aubergine, fresh fish, dried fish, bagged spices etc. Mostly frequented by women sellers in bright and beautiful dresses.

Market at Janjanbureh, The Gambia. Spread of fish on sale at the market at Janjanbureh, The Gambia.

The main streets in towns are lined with vendors selling bananas, fried dumplings, bread, nuts etc. Baguettes are popular with different fillings and wrapped in a torn sheet of newspaper. Today, we had baguettes with dumplings made from black eyed beans in a spicy sauce. So tasty!

Bean dumplings in baguette at Janjanbureh, The Gambia.

We left Janjanbureh on a ferry into Lamin Koto for 50 GMD and headed for The Wassu Stones. These megaliths have some similarity to Stone Henge in the UK, but there are multiple formations across multiple sites.

In Senegal and The Gambia, I noticed local people, especially children, sayin g the word Toubab to us. Initially, I thought it meant hello. However, it's actually a non-derogatory term for a white and wealthy person. It feels strange when hearing these word.

On our way into Farrafenni, we sought refuge from the mid-afternoon heat in a fuel station. We got chatting to the staff, and they were very accommodating. So much so that they invited us to share there lunch with them! The staff at the fuel station ate together from two bowls of rice. They offered Jonny and I their chairs and spoons whilst some of them squatted on the floor and used their hands to cup the rice into balls for eating. I asked if I could take a photo of everyone eating but they weren't keen on the idea, but a photo of the food was OK.

Invited to share food at fuel station at Farafenni, The Gambia.

We left Farafenni to find a spot to camp. The road turned into a track and became increasingly over grown. Following the line of the track was difficult as it disappeared in the grass that was almost as tall as the motorcycle! It's very quiet down here, so I decided to camp for the night. Jonny moved on to another spot for the evening.

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