Now that I was in Guinea after an epic crossing, the plan was to ride North to find a waterfall that I'd heard about.

The route from Boke to Gaouol was unpaved and very rough in places. My speed was 10-15 mph in places but reaching 30 mph felt unsafe as potholes appeared out of nowhere. I was astonished to find articulated lorries on this route! This route and its inhabitants in mud and straw huts appear much less affluent than East of Gaouol where I found brick and mortar houses. This is what the route looked like.

Condition of route from Boke to Gaouol, Guinea. Condition of route from Boke to Gaouol, Guinea. Condition of route from Boke to Gaouol, Guinea.

It's common to see goats and cows wandering the roads. However, this cow appeared to be in the middle of nowhere without another one nearby. Bit like me really!

Condition of route from Boke to Gaouol, Guinea.

Stopping for food in Koumbia, I ate something and have no idea what it was! It had a jelly-like consistency and was in a soupy sauce. So tasty!

I ate this and have no idea what it was! Koumbia, Guinea.

In Koumbia, I met an English-speaking Guinean who had studied in London. We chatted about the differences between the countries and he helped translate a conversation with an elderly local man. The elderly local man had spent 12 years in Paris when all he needed was an ID card, which is not the case any more.

Myself (left), English-speaking chap (middle), and elderly gentleman (right) in Koumbia, Guinea.

The following day, I stopped off in Labe to add credit to my SIM card and purchase food supplies. It was 11am and I was extremely hungry, so I tucked into rice and grilled Tilapia fish in a restaurant. Unsurprisingly, I was the only one eating at that time!

Rice and fish at 11 am in Labe, Guinea.

After refueling my motorcycle, I was updating the blog in the shade of the forecourt. I got chatting to Mustafa. He was very interested about the journey. A frequent desire among the people I have met is to leave their country and go to Europe or America.

I found the Salaa falls at the end of a 12-mile track. Lots of locals were washing clothes and motorcycles in the water. One group were having a barbeque, whilst another group were listening to loud music on a portable HiFi. I couldn't see any waterfalls, just rapids. I was slightly underwhelmed.

The following morning, there was no one around, so I started taking photos and followed the river down stream to discover... the waterfall!

Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea. Salaa waterfalls, Guinea.

Conakry was 250 miles away, but the roads were too slow so I found a spot to camp. I bought fresh spinach for the first time on this journey and had this with potatoes. Super healthy meal and so tasty!

Spinach and potato for supper!.

The sunset was stunning and a nice to end a few days searching for a waterfall!

Sunset from camping spot near Sougueta, Guinea.

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