After collecting my visa for Ghana, I was ready to continue East. Several places have been recommended as good places to camp along the coast. I stayed at three beach places consecutively. One of them was outstanding and I would highly recommend.

In the few days before leaving Grand-Bassam, I met Axel who is travelling around West Africa on vacation and we enjoyed a few beers. Just before leaving the hotel, I met Morgan who is walking from Sierra Leone to Nigeria! Both are top guys and good fun.

I found decent motorcycle engine oil in Abidjan, which is hard to find and cost a small fortune, so I changed oil before departing Grand-Bassam. Recommended oil change is 8000 miles but I aim for about 4000-5000 miles to keep the beast healthy. The motorcycle felt instantly revived with more pep and responsiveness. Loved it! :D

A short trip on a back road/track, I arrived at Hotel Jardin d'Eden in Assouindé, Cote d'Ivoire. Lovely hotel in a prominent building. Camped in grass car park in return for purchasing a meal in the restaurant. I immediately setup camp and relaxed on the beach watching the world go by.

Relaxing on the beach at Hotel Jardin D'Eden. Assouindé, Côte d'Ivoire.

Definitely a holiday resort as I saw families and couples from outside Africa. People riding horses and quads on the beach. Food was very tasty! Sand felt fine and compact under my feet, and it made a scrunch sound similar to walking on snow.

After a seamless border crossing from Cote d'Ivoire into Ghana, I headed straight for Ezile Bay Ecolodge. The last stretch to the lodge is by track and my friend had warned me to avoid a specific route. However, the GPS took me on that very route without me knowing! I knew it was the track because it narrowed to a foot path with a foot bridge. Two local lads also said not to continue!

Track narrowed to a footpath with a footbridge between Agona and Akwidaa, Ghana. I turned around!

Backtracked a little and I eventually arrived! Ezile Bay Ecolodge is spread across the entire bay and it's absolutely spectacular! Chairs and sun loungers sprawled on to the beach from the lodge and it feels like paradise.

Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana.

Nearby villagers walked passed on their way to work. They carried provisions for the day, such as water, and tools for work, which is typically a machete. The amount of logs the women carry on their heads is impressive!

Whilst sitting on the bay tinkering with my PDA, the resident puppy was great fun and refreshing. Absolutely adorable, a bit daft, but relentlessly playful!

Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Playful puppy. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Playful puppy. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Playful puppy. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Playful puppy. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Playful puppy. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Playful puppy. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana.

The food was local/national and super tasty. Omo Tuo, which are like large rice balls, with fish in groundnut/peanut soup.

Omo Tuo, which are like large rice balls, with fish in groundnut/peanut soup. Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana.

Whilst resting at Ezile Bay Ecolodge, I ventured to Cape Three Points to visit the lighthouse.

Inside the lighthouse at Cape Three Points, Ghana. Me at the top of Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana.

Spectacular views from top of the lighthouse.

View from Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana. View from Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana. View from Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana. View from Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana. View from Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana. View from Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana.

I wandered around the grounds too.

The grounds at Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana. The grounds at Cape Three Points lighthouse, Ghana.

Having spent a few days at Ezile Bay Ecolodge, I was ready to leave for my next destination!

Packed and ready to leave Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana. Packed and ready to leave Ezile Bay Ecolodge, Ghana.

After the lighthouse, I rode to Stumble Inn at Elmina town. Stumble Inn had a beach, but a new sea defense wall of large stone blocked the sea. Two bikers turned up, and I had the pleasure of meeting them. Ericko, an Italian guy on a Suzuki and Marko, a Romanian guy on a Yamaha Super Ténéré. Great guys and was lovely chatting to them. Marko has been riding round the world since 2009 and he is deaf and mute.

Some of the guys working at Stumble Inn climbed a coconut tree, which looked precarious but they knew what they were doing. I tried fresh coconut water and also the flesh. Both were incredibly tasty, and the flesh was very soft and floppy.

After a few days at Stumble Inn, I finally continued East towards Accra.

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